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Windows Malware Analysis Specific


Item name: "Skype" Trojan Analysis
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Nicolas Brulez                        
Home URL: http://securitylabs.websense.com/
Last updated: January 2, 2007
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://securitylabs.websense.com/content/Blogs/2642.aspx
Description: This blogpost shows how the author reversed a malware that was spreading through Skype.
Interesting reference are the decryption and IE injection analysis part.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Practical malware analysis
Rating: 3.0 (1 vote)
Author: Kris Kendall, Chad McMillan                        
Home URL: http://www.mandiant.com/
Last updated: 2007
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://www.blackhat.com/presentations/bh-dc-07/Kendall_McMillan/Presentation/bh-dc-07-Kendall_McMillan.pdf
Description: This PDF from BlackHat'07 is interesting cause it gets straight to the point, only essential information are written on it.
It shortly describes how to set up en environment, malware analysis on windows, difference between static and dynamic, and quick words about armored malware (packing, encryption) as well as tools to sort it out.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: State Of Malware: Family Ties
Rating: 3.0 (1 vote)
Author: Ero Carrera & Peter Silberman                        
Home URL: http://www.mandiant.com/
Last updated: April 12, 2010
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: https://media.blackhat.com/bh-eu-10/whitepapers/Carrera_Silberman/BlackHat-EU-2010-Carrera-Silberman-State-of-Malware-wp.pdf
Description: The two guys have been collecting some of the widest spread malware on the net, and studied them to cluster them into families and find correlations between malware from different sources and with different goals.

They introduced a graph tool, BinCrowd, from Zynamics.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: A Journey to the Center of the Rustock.B Rootkit
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Frank Boldewin                        
Home URL: http://www.reconstructer.org
Last updated: January 20, 2007
Version (if appl.): 1.0
Direct D/L link: http://antirootkit.com/articles/A-Journey-to-the-Center-of-the-Rustock-B-Rootkit/index.htm
Description: "You try to look innocent, but what's behind the curtain? Whatever you hide or pretend will be detected - this is certain!" On 27th December 2006 I found a sample of the Rustock.B Rootkit at www.offensivecomputing.net, which was only sparsely analyzed at this time. I was keen to study its behaviour, as I’ve heard a lot of stories about this infamous Rootkit. Rustock included several techniques to obfuscate the driver which could be stumbling blocks for the researcher. Analyzing the binary was quite fun. Recalling the work I’ve done over the last few days, it is clear that Rustock is quite different from most other Rootkits I’ve seen in the past. It is not much because Rustock uses new techniques, but rather because it combines dozens of known tricks from other malware which makes it very effective.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Advanced malare analysis lab
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Wes Brown                        
Home URL: http://www.ioactive.com/
Last updated: July 4, 2010
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2010ams/materials/D2T3%20-%20Wes%20Brown%20-%20Advanced%20Malware%20Analysis%20Lab.pdf
Description: Among the techniques reviewed will be memory inspection, debugging, hooking, as well as PE file examination. Techniques that malware use to avoid being inspected will be discussed along with ways to work around them. The malware workshop environment will also be walked through and each tool demonstrated so that the workshop attendee would leave with a good grasp of how and when to use them.
Also listed in: Linux Malware Analysis Articles, Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Capture, care and analysis of Malware made easy
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Blake McNeill                        
Home URL: http://www.linklogger.com/blog/index.php
Last updated: January 3, 2007
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://www.linklogger.com/vm_capture.htm
Description: This article describe the process of setting up an environment with Virtual PC 2007 to capture malware on Windows. Although being quite old it is interesting to see an alternative to VMWare.



"One of the best ways to learn about something is to play with it and see what it does and how it behaves in a controlled environment. This also applies to learning about worms and viruses, but the problem with doing this is typically the computer you used to experiment with was trashed in the process and rebuilding a computer from scratch can be a huge hassle. Now if could simply drop the now infected computer in the garbage when you were done playing, and with no cost, then there would be very little preventing you from learning about malware, if you so wished."
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Conficker C P2P Protocol and Implementation
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Phillip Porras, Hassen Saidi and Vinod Yegneswaran                        
Home URL: http://mtc.sri.com/
Last updated: September 21, 2009
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://mtc.sri.com/Conficker/P2P/index.html
Description: This report presents a reverse engineering of the obfuscated binary code image of the Conficker C peer-to-peer (P2P) service. It implements the functions necessary to bootstrap an infected host into the Conficker P2P network through scan-based peer discovery, and allows peers to share and spawn new binary logic directly into the currently running Conficker C process. Conficker's P2P logic and implementation are dissected and presented in source code form. The report documents its thread architecture, presents the P2P message structure and exchange protocol, and describes the major functional elements of this module.

MD5 of the sample analyzed: 5e279ef7fcb58f841199e0ff55cdea8b
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Intermediate Intel x86: Architecture, Assembly, Applications, & Alliteration
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Xeno Kovah                        
Home URL: http://opensecuritytraining.info/
Last updated: July 15, 2011
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://opensecuritytraining.info/IntermediateX86.html
Description: This is a 2 day class which is freely available to watch. You can also take the materials and use them to teach your own classes.

--

Building upon the Introductory Intel x86 class, this class goes into more depth on topics already learned, and introduces more advanced topics that dive deeper into how Intel-based systems work.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

•Physical and virtual memory and how a limited amount of physical memory is represented as much more virtual memory through a multilevel paging system. We will also talk about memory segmentation.
•The hardware basis for kernel versus userspace separation and how software transitions between the two. This portion answers the question of why does x86 have 4 “rings”, with ring 0 being the most privileged, and ring 3 being the least.
•Hardware and software interrupts, and how they are the basis for debugging.
•Input/Output instructions and how these allow the CPU to talk to peripherals.

Example applications include showing how hardware and memory mechanisms are used for software exploits, anti-debug techniques, rootkit hiding, and direct hardware access for keystroke logging.

This material includes labs on:
•Using WinDbg to perform kernel debugging on a virtual machine (which is equally applicable for debugging a real machine.)
•Using a custom WinDbg plugin to examine the Local (memory segment) Descriptor Table (LDT), and Global (memory segment) Descriptor Table (GDT) in order to understand how Windows sets memory segment ranges and permissions for userspace and kernel space.
•Using WinDbg and the !pte command to understand how Windows organizes its paging structures which map physical memory to virtual memory.
•Investigating where exactly the XD/NX bit is set in order to make memory as non-executable (which Microsoft calls Data Execution Prevention (DEP)), to prevent some types of exploits from succeeding.
•Using the Read Timestamp Counter (RDTSC) instruction to profile code execution time. Also, using a profile of code execution time to change a program’s behavior in the presence of a debugger (e.g. executing different code if the code appears to have been stopped at a breakpoint.)
•Printing information about task state segments, which hold information that is used to find the kernel stack when an interrupt occurs.
•Watching what does and doesn’t change when a software interrupt is used to transfer control from userspace to kernel.
•Reading the Interrupt Descriptor Table (IDT) and understanding the security implications of changes to it.
•Understanding how RedPill uses the IDT in order to detect that a system is virtualized.
•Having a process read its own memory when a software breakpoint is set, in order to see how a debugger will change memory to set the breakpoint but hide the change from the user.
•Watch how hardware-based breakpoints manipulate dedicated debug registers.
•Using port input/output to access the backdoor communications channel that VMWare uses in order to send copy/paste, mouse movement, and other events in and out of a VM.
•Using port I/O in order to talk directly to the PS2 keyboard controller in order to sniff keystrokes or flash keyboard LEDs.

Knowledge of this material is strongly encouraged for future classes such as Rootkits. (offered at http://opensecuritytraining.info/Training.html)
Also listed in: Generic Malware Analysis Tutorials, Generic Reversing Technique Tutorials, Windows Internals Tutorials, Windows Malware Analysis Tutorials, X86 Internals Tutorials
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Item name: Introduction To Reverse Engineering Software
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Matt Briggs                        
Home URL: http://opensecuritytraining.info/
Last updated: June 16, 2011
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://opensecuritytraining.info/IntroductionToReverseEngineering.html
Description: This is a 2 days worth of class materials that you can use to teach your own classes.

--

Throughout the history of invention curious minds have sought to understand the inner workings of their gadgets. Whether investigating a broken watch, or improving an engine, these people have broken down their goods into their elemental parts to understand how they work. This is Reverse Engineering (RE), and it is done every day from recreating outdated and incompatible software, understanding malicious code, or exploiting weaknesses in software.

In this course we will explore what drives people to reverse engineer software and the methodology and tools used to do it.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
•Uses for RE
•The tricks and pitfalls of analyzing compiled code
•Identifying calling conventions
•How to navigate x86 assembly using IDA Pro
•Identifying Control Flows
•Identifying the Win32 API
•Using a debugger to aid RE
•Dynamic Analysis tools and techniques for RE

During the course students will complete many hands on exercises.

Introduction to x86 and Life of Binaries (both available at http://opensecuritytraining.info/Training.html) are prerequisites for this class.

This class will serve as a prerequisite for a later class specifically on malware analysis.
Also listed in: Generic Malware Analysis Tutorials, Generic Reversing Technique Tutorials, Generic Tool Tutorials, Windows Malware Analysis Tutorials
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Item name: Malware Analysis: Environment Design and Architecture
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Adrian Sanabria                        
Home URL: http://www.sans.org/
Last updated: January 18, 2007
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://www.sans.org/reading_room/whitepapers/threats/malware_analysis_environment_design_and_artitecture_1841
Description: This academic article precisely describes the possible ways of setting up a malware analysis environment (both physical and virtualized).
Also listed in: Linux Malware Analysis Articles, Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Mass Malware Analysis: A Do-It-Yourself Kit
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Christian Wojner                        
Home URL: http://cert.at/
Last updated: October 14, 2009
Version (if appl.): 1.0
Direct D/L link: http://cert.at/static/downloads/papers/cert.at-mass_malware_analysis_1.0.pdf
Description: This paper outlines the relevant steps to build up a customizable automated malware analysis station by using only freely available components with the exception of the target OS (Windows XP) itself. Further a special focus lies in handling a huge amount of malware samples and the actual implementation at CERT.at. As primary goal the reader of this paper should be able to build up her own specific installation and configuration while being free in her decision which components to use.

The first part of this document will cover all the theoretical, strategic and methodological aspects. The second part is focusing on the practical aspects by diving into CERT.at's automated malware analysis station closing with an easy to follow step-by-step tutorial, how to build up CERT.at's implementation for your own use. So feel free to skip parts.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Peacomm.C: Cracking the nutshell
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Frank Boldewin                        
Home URL: http://www.reconstructer.org
Last updated: September 21, 2007
Version (if appl.): 1.0
Direct D/L link: http://www.antirootkit.com/articles/eye-of-the-storm-worm/Peacomm-C-Cracking-the-nutshell.html
Description: The first variant "Peacomm.A" was detected in the mid of January 2007 and since then it has grown to one of the most successful botnets ever seen in the wild. It uses an adjusted Overnet protocol for spreading and communication. Its main intense is spamming and DDoS attacking. Also the fast-flux service
network which is being used by the criminals behind the attacks is really amazing and frightening at the same time. As its botnet activities are not the focus of this essay, I've included interesting other papers covering these topics.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Reverse-Engineering Malware
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Lenny Zeltser                        
Home URL: http://zeltser.com
Last updated: 2001
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://zeltser.com/reverse-malware-paper/
Description: This article describes each step in the analysis of IRC.SRVCP_Trojan (Symantec).
It can be completed with the following related URL.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Reversing Malware: Analysis of the worm "Tibick.D"
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Daniel Schoepe                        
Home URL: http://lesco.le.funpic.de
Last updated: November 6, 2006
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://lesco.le.funpic.de/files/articles/rev_malware1/tibick.d.html
Description: This article describes the steps and tools used in Tibick.D worm analysis:infection routine, backdoor and replication routine code explanation.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Rootkits: What they are, and how to find them
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Xeno Kovah                        
Home URL: http://opensecuritytraining.info/
Last updated: September 21, 2011
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://opensecuritytraining.info/Rootkits.html
Description: This is a 2 day class which is freely available to watch. You can also take the materials and use them to teach your own classes.

--

Introductory Intel x86, Intermediate Intel x86, and Life of Binaries (all available at http://opensecuritytraining.info/Training.html) are strongly recommended to be taken before of this class.

Rootkits are a class of malware which are dedicated to hiding the attacker’s presence on a compromised system. This class will focus on understanding how rootkits work, and what tools can be used to help find them.

This will be a very hands-on class where we talk about specific techniques which rootkits use, and then do labs where we show how a proof of concept rootkit is able to hide things from a defender. Example techniques include
•Trojaned binaries
•Inline hooks
•Import Address Table (IAT) hooking
•System Call Table/System Service Descriptor Table (SSDT) hooking
•Interrupt Descriptor Table (IDT) hooking
•Direct Kernel Object Manipulation (DKOM)
•Kernel Object Hooking (KOH)
•IO Request Packet (IRP) filtering
•Hiding files/processes/open ports
•Compromising the Master Boot Record (MBR) to install a “bootkit”

The class will help the student learn which tools to use to look for rootkits on Windows systems, how to evaluate the breadth of a tool’s detection capabilities, and how to interpret tool results.

This class is structured so that students are given a homework to detect rootkits *before* they have taken the class. This homework is given in the context of the following scenario:

“You, being the only ‘security person’ in the area, have been called in to
examine a running Windows server because "it's acting funny." They don't
care that you like Mac/Linux/BSD/Plan9 better, you need to look at it! You
are solemnly informed that this is system is mission critical and can only
be rebooted if absolutely necessary. You must investigate whether any sort
of compromise has taken place on the system, with minimal impact to the
mission. What do you do? What DO you DO?”

The homework is then for the student to use any means at their disposal to write up answers to the following questions: “What malicious changes were made to the system?”, “What tools did you use to detect the changes?”, “How can you remove the changes?”. The students’ answers are then anonymized and shared with the rest of the class afterwards, so that they can see how others approached the problem, and learn from their techniques. The anonymization of the homework before distribution is important so that students know that even though they don’t know, and aren’t expected to know, anything about the area yet, their entry will not be judged by other students.
Also listed in: Generic Malware Analysis Tutorials, Generic Protection Technique Tutorials, Generic Reversing Technique Tutorials, Windows Internals Tutorials, Windows Malware Analysis Tutorials, Windows Tool Tutorials
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Item name: Stealth MBR Rootkit
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: GMER                        
Home URL: http://www.gmer.net
Last updated: January 2, 2008
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://www2.gmer.net/mbr/
Description: At the end of 2007 stealth MBR rootkit was discovered by MR Team members (thanks to Tammy & MJ) and it looks like this way of affecting NT systems could be more common in near future if MBR stays unprotected.

"Good points" of being MBR rootkit:
full control of machine boot process-code is executed before the OS starts
rootkit does not need a file - code could exists in some sectors of the disk and it cannot be deleted as a usual file
rootkit does not need any registry entry because it is loaded by MBR code
to hide itself, rootkit needs to control only a few sectors of the disk

How MBR rootkit works :
Installer
MBR loader
Kernel patcher
Kernel driver loader
Sectors hider/protector
Kernel driver
Detection
Rootkit removal
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Stuxnet's Rootkit (MRxNet) into C++
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Amr Thabet                        
Home URL: http://www.amrthabet.co.cc
Last updated: January 28, 2011
Version (if appl.): 1.00
Direct D/L link: Locally archived copy
Description: This project is to convert mrxnet.sys into readable C++ source code very similar to the equivalent native code in mrxnet.sys sample .

Copyrights:
-----------
These Files (except mrxnet.sys) were created by Amr Thabet and coyrighted (c) by him

Files:
------
1.mrxnet.sys : The rootkit sample
2.mrxnet.idb : The IDA Pro database for Version 5.1
3.main.c  : The main source code of mrxnet.sys rootkit sample (created by reversing manually of mrxnet.sys with only IDA Pro)
4.FastIo.c  : The FastIoDispatch (you could ignore this part

The others are used for compiling the source code

Notes:
------
The source code is 95% similar to the real rootkit but that doesn't mean it should work exactly like mrxnet.sys as it still contain bugs and need to be fixed
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Swimming into hostile code: Gamethief.Win32.Magania
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Giuseppe Bonfa                        
Home URL: http://evilcodecave.blogspot.com
Last updated: August 2009
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://www.accessroot.com/arteam/site/download.php?view.313
Description: Trojan-GameThief.Win32.Magania, according to Kaspersky naming convention, monitors the user activities trying to obtain valuable information from the affected user, especially about gaming login accounts. This long tutorial analyze this malware but is also a general document which explains how to analyze a modern nested-dolls malware.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: TDL3 - Why so serious? Let's put a smile on that face ..
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Nguyễn Phố Sơn                        
Home URL: http://www.rootkit.com
Last updated: November 9, 2009
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://www.rootkit.com/vault/thug4lif3/tdl3_analysis_paper_ed.rar
Description: TLD3/TDSS malware analysis, a good paper from rootkit.com

BEWARE - password of the archive: tdl3_analysis

TDL or TDSS family is a famous trojan variant for its effectiveness and active technical development. It contains couple compoments: a kernel-mode rootkit and user-mode DLLs which performs the trojan operation such as downloaders, blocking Avs, etc,. Since the rootkit acts as an “injector” and protector for the usermode bot binaries, almost all technical evolutions of this threat family focus on rootkit technology so as to evade AV scanners. .
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: The Life of Binaries
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Xeno Kovah                        
Home URL: http://opensecuritytraining.info/
Last updated: September 6, 2011
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://opensecuritytraining.info/LifeOfBinaries.html
Description: This is a 2 day class which is freely available to watch. You can also take the materials and use them to teach your own classes.

--


Topics include but are not limited to:
• Scanning and tokenizing source code.
• Parsing a grammar.
• Different targets for x86 assembly object files generation. (E.g. relocatable vs. position independent code).
• Linking object files together to create a well-formed binary.
• Detailed descriptions of the high level similarities and low level differences between the Windows PE and Linux ELF binary formats. (NOTE: we didn't get to this in the class where the video was recorded, but the materials are in the slides)
• How an OS loads a binary into memory and links it on the fly before executing it.

Along the way we discuss the relevance of security at different stages of a binary’s life, from the tricks that can be played by a malicious compiler, to how viruses really work, to the way which malware “packers” duplicate OS process execution functionality, to the benefit of a security-enhanced OS loader which implements address space layout randomization (ASLR).

Lab work includes:
• Manipulating compiler options to change the type of assembly which is output
• Manipulating linker options to change the structure of binary formats
• Reading and understanding PE files with PEView
• Reading and understanding ELF files with Readelf (NOTE: we didn't get to this in the class where the video was recorded, but the materials are in the slides)
• Using WinDbg and/or GDB to watch the loader dynamically link an executable
• Using Thread Local Storage (TLS) to obfuscate control flow and serve as a basic anti-debug mechanism
• Creating a simple example virus for PE
• Analyze the changes made to the binary format when a file is packed with UPX
• Using the rootkit technique of Import Address Table (IAT) hooking to subvert the integrity of a program’s calls to external libraries, allowing files to be hidden.

Knowledge of this material is recommended, but not required, for future classes such as Rootkits, but is required for reverse engineering. (Both also at http://opensecuritytraining.info/Training.html)
Also listed in: Generic Malware Analysis Tutorials, Generic Protection Technique Tutorials, Generic Reversing Technique Tutorials, Linux ELF Articles, Windows Internals Tutorials, Windows Malware Analysis Tutorials, Windows Reversing Technique Tutorials, Windows Tool Tutorials, Windows Unpacking Tutorials
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Item name: The Molecular Virology of Lexotan32: Metamorphism Illustrated
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Orr                        
Home URL: http://www.antilife.org/
Last updated: August 16, 2007
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: https://www.openrce.org/articles/full_view/29
Description: Orr strikes again, here is an interesting article about (another) metamorphic malware released by Vecna, on VX Heavens in 2002.
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: The Viral Darwinism of W32.Evol
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Orr                        
Home URL: http://www.antilife.org/
Last updated: February 6, 2007
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: https://www.openrce.org/articles/full_view/27
Description: This article posted on OpenRCE, deals with Win32.Evol, a true metamoprhic engine-powered malware.
Do not miss the reversed and commented engine code (follows in related urls).
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: usb_driver.com (hhbcddropper) analysis
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Mike Ciavarella & Nathan Martini                        
Home URL: http://www.blackfortressindustries.com
Last updated: May 21, 2010
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: http://www.blackfortressindustries.com/malware-analysis/usb-removable-media/HuJuYinFuexianning-1925CE96DB51A0CF18AA6489FA2471C3089D6E8B-8F83E88ECD1466E7482D69ABAAC9935E/hhbcddropper.pdf
Description: A very detailed analysis of this USB infector malware

1 Attachments:
2 Back Story:
3 Related To:
4 Summary of Activity:
5 Detailed Operation of Code Analysis:
5.1 autorun.inf
5.2 usb_driver.com (–¼‡‘Š•†‘Í€ŒŽ)
5.2.1 Executable Configuration
5.2.2 Embedded file/URL
5.2.3 Embedded File/URL Configuration
5.2.4 Encryption
5.2.5 Strings
5.2.6 Virtual Environment Detection
5.2.7 Fake Message Box
5.2.8 Kill Process
5.2.9 Melt Stub
5.2.10 Firewall Exception
5.2.11 Dropping Files
6 Forensic Details:
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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Item name: Virut.A Malware Analysis Paper
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Amr Thabet                        
Home URL: http://amrthabet.blogspot.com/
Last updated: September 3, 2010
Version (if appl.):
Direct D/L link: Locally archived copy
Description: Virut.A Malware Analysis Paper with commented sources,the detection and disinfection of virut using Pokas x86 Emulator at:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/x86emu/files/
Also listed in: Windows Malware Analysis Articles
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